Eats, Shoot & Leaves [2] – Truss, Lynne

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ISBN: 1592400876
Title: Eats, Shoot & Leaves
Author: Truss, Lynne
Binding: Hardcover
Publisher: Gotham Books, New York
Publication Date: 2004
Edition: First Edition. Fourth Printing.
Book Condition: VG
D-j Condition: NF

Comments: Remainder mark on bottom edge.

Synopsis: We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty, and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to George Orwell shunning the semicolon, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.

Description

ISBN: 1592400876
Title: Eats, Shoot & Leaves
Author: Truss, Lynne
Binding: Hardcover
Publisher: Gotham Books, New York
Publication Date: 2004
Edition: First Edition. Fourth Printing.
Book Condition: VG
D-j Condition: NF

Comments: Remainder mark on bottom edge.

Synopsis: We all know the basics of punctuation. Or do we? A look at most neighborhood signage tells a different story. Through sloppy usage and low standards on the internet, in email, and now text messages, we have made proper punctuation an endangered species. In Eats, Shoots & Leaves, former editor Lynne Truss dares to say, in her delightfully urbane, witty, and very English way, that it is time to look at our commas and semicolons and see them as the wonderful and necessary things they are. This is a book for people who love punctuation and get upset when it is mishandled. From the invention of the question mark in the time of Charlemagne to George Orwell shunning the semicolon, this lively history makes a powerful case for the preservation of a system of printing conventions that is much too subtle to be mucked about with.

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